Tiffany. In college. Likes art. Lives for science.

"Let us think the unthinkable, let us do the undoable. Let us prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after all." - Douglas Adams, Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency

Photography

theenergyissue:

Takashi Murakami’s Jellyfish Eyes: Sci-Fi, Anime, and Fukushima

Known for blurring the line between high and low arts, Japanese artist Takashi Murakami combines pointed critiques of post-war Japan with a colorful pop aesthetic. Indeed, his prints have adorned Louis Vuitton purses but also make regular appearances at Sotheby’s and international galleries and museums. He coined the term “superflat” to describe the two-dimensional quality of Japanese artsa characteristic of everything from wood block prints to manga—and the superficial nature of post-war Japanese culture and society. “Superflat” is also used as a moniker to describe Murakami’s own artistic style and that of other Japanese artists he has influenced. Jellyfish Eyes (2013) represents Murakami’s first foray into feature-length film, and it explores post-Fukushima Japan and the uneasy, ongoing relationship with nuclear energy in Japanese culture. Taking elements from sci-fi, traditional Japanese daikaju monster films like Godzilla, anime, and Japanese notions of kawaii, or “cuteness,” Murakami examines how his society has “flattened” serious questions, concerns, and fears into these “childish” cultural phenomena. In the film, schoolchildren are bestowed with Pokémon-like monster companions that they can summon with their cell phones. Unbeknownst to them, however, the nearby nuclear plant is harvesting their data and negative energy through these “F.R.I.E.N.D.s” to create a monstrous agent of destruction. As Murakami notes, this uneasy relationship with energy reflects a fraught reality:

Even now that popular sentiment has largely turned against nuclear energy, we still cannot stop its use. I can’t help but feel that this dilemma is much like that of a country that wants to end a war but cannot.

(Source: youtube.com, via experimentsinmotion)

theenergyissue:

Tracking Movement with Human Smartphone App

Using data collected from the Human smartphone app, major urban centers such as London, New York and Amsterdam have been drawn with pixels created by its users’ movements. The resulting imagery shows the unique energetic patterns created over time according to different types of motion: walking, cycling, running, and motorized transportation. The iPhone app was originally designed to encourage users to undertake at least 30 minutes of exercise each day, but the live maps it has created reveal how a ‘simple’ consumer app can lead to insights on a larger scale, from a population’s physical health to tools for urban planning.

(Source: dezeen.com, via experimentsinmotion)